The Most Beautiful Star-shaped Flowers Uses and Importance
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The Most Beautiful Star-shaped Flowers Uses and Importance

Do you have a garden? How many species of plant that bear star-shaped flowers do you have? There are thousands of different species of flowering plants all over the world but only a few bear star-shaped flowers. Star-shaped flowers are truly beauties to behold. LetÂ’s travel the world over and find the most beautiful star-shaped flowers.

Do you have a garden? How many species of plant that bear star-shaped flowers do you have? There are thousands of different species of flowering plants all over the world but only a few bear star-shaped flowers. Star-shaped flowers are truly beauties to behold. Let’s travel the world over and find the most beautiful star-shaped flowers.

Here’s a collection of the prettiest star-shaped flowers from around the world.

Showy Milkweed  (Asclepias speciosa)

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Scientific name: Asclepias speciosa

 

Common name/s: Showy Milkweed

 

Origin: Western North America

 

Feature: Star-shaped flowers

 

Uses/Importance: Native American peoples eat some parts of the plant and use all parts for many medicinal uses

Glory-of-the-snow (Chionodoxa)

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Scientific name: Chionodoxa

 

Common name/s:  Glory-of-the-snow

 

Origin:   Mediterranean region

 

Feature:  Flowers bloom when snow melt in spring

 

Uses/Importance:   It’s a valuable garden ornamental

California Milkweed (Asclepias californica)

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Scientific name:  Asclepias californica

 

Common name/s: California Milkweed

 

Origin: California, USA

 

Feature:  Star-shaped flowers

 

Uses/Importance: The plant is consumed as candy by Kawaiisu people, indigenous tribe of California. The flavorful and chewy leaves are cooked and eaten for its milky sap

Windflower (Anemone nemorosa)

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Scientific name: Anemone nemorosa

 

Common name/s: Windflower, Smell Fox, Thimbleweed and Wood Anemone,

 

Origin: Europe

 

Feature: Poisonous to humans and animals

 

Uses/Importance: This plant species is grown as ornamental plant and for medicinal purposes

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The above picture of Windflowers in Sweden shows six, seven, eight and nine petals

Eastern Bluestar (Amsonia tabernaemontana)

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Scientific name: Amsonia tabernaemontana

 

Common name/s: Eastern Bluestar

 

Origin: United States

 

Feature: Leaves turn yellow in autumn

 

Uses/Importance: Grown as ornamental plant as borders or rock gardens

Antelope Horn (Asclepias asperula)

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Scientific name: Asclepias asperula

 

Common name/s: Antelope Horns, Green-flowered Milkweed and Spider Antelope Horn

 

Origin: Southwestern United States

 

Feature: Poisonous to humans and animals

 

Uses/Importance: Food for Monarch butterflies

Woolly Bluestar (Amsonia tomentosa)

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Scientific name: Amsonia tomentosa

 

Common name/s: Woolly Bluestar, Gray Amsonia

 

Origin: Southwestern United States

 

Feature: Star-shaped flowers

Serbian Bellflower (Campanula poscharskyana)

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Scientific name: Campanula poscharskyana

 

Common name/s: Serbian Bellflower

 

Origin: Dinaric Alps in Yoguslavia

 

Feature: Valued for its lavender-blue star-shaped flowers

 

Uses/Importance: The leaves are edible year round, and can be put in salads.

Italian Bellflower (Campanula isophylla)

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Scientific name:

 

Common name/s:  Italian Bellflower, Falling Stars, Star of Bethlehem and Trailing Campanula

 

Origin:  Europe

 

Feature: As an ornamental, it is best suited for a hanging basket

 

Uses/Importance:   The flowers last a considerable long time

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Comments (4)

Beautiful piece!

I allow milkweed to grow in my garden here in Colorado because it is a host plant for the Monarch butterfly. The bees and butterflies are all over it when it blooms and the blossoms are VERY fragrant.

I enjoyed reading about the "uses" of the flowers!

Really beautiful!

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